It’s the second week of ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown in Singapore. The libraries are closed, and online retailers are taking days or even weeks to deliver newly ordered paperbacks. If you will soon run out of reading material, worry not! In the second part of our 5 Translated Books series (read our first post: 5 Translated Pandemic Novels to Read While Social Distancing) for avid readers who are now stuck indoors, we have compiled a list of self-help e-books translated from Korean, Japanese, German and Czech which you can get from Amazon right away. 

1. Grab and Go

Translated from Korean by Hannah Pang, Grab and Go: A Food Business Millionaire’s Secrets to Achieving What He Wants in Life distils the essence of Jim Kim’s success as a food business entrepreneur. What were the lessons he learned from a chicken farmer that transformed his management philosophy? How did he penetrate a $500 million food business industry with only three words – what were these three words anyway? What are his views on credit cards, Jack Georges bags, fruit trees and money, and why do these views matter to his success? If you are looking for stimulating perspectives and practical takeaways that will refresh your life and career, look no further than Grab and Go.

Read a sample and purchase the paperback from our website, or get the e-book from Amazon.

 

2. The Art of Thinking Clearly

Translated from German by Nicky Griffin, Rolf Dobelli’s The Art of Thinking Clearly catalogues the cognitive biases that human beings are prone to, and which shape our everyday decision making: confirmation bias, authority bias, availability bias, liking bias, hindsight bias, gambler’s fallacy, false-consensus effect, and so on. By identifying these common cognitive biases, this compendium of ninety-nine essays helps the reader to recognise potential errors of judgement and, hopefully, make better choices. It is crucial to note, however, that Dobelli is an entrepreneur and philosopher – not a psychologist – so do not expect in-depth analysis of every bias mentioned in his book.

Get the e-book from Amazon.

3. The End of Procrastination

Translated from Czech by Adela Schicker, The End of Procrastination: How to Stop Postponing and Live a Fulfilled Life by Czech entrepreneur Petr Ludwig offers eight practical tools to manage your time and end procrastination. Even though most of us face unending to-do lists, deadlines and dozens of emails, we can’t seem to take control of our time and tackle problems directly. The End of Procrastination helps us understand the science behind why we postpone things and equips us with the knowledge needed to overcome procrastination. This might be the book you need if you are struggling to complete your to-do lists while staying home.

Get the e-book from Amazon.

 

4. Man’s Search for Meaning

Translated from German by Ilse Lasch, Man’s Search for Meaning chronicles Viennese psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War. In Auschwitz he observed that everything could be taken away from prisoners except their ability to determine their own attitude, and this led Frankl to contend that humans are unable to avoid suffering but we can find meaning in it and move forward with renewed purpose. He developed the psychotherapeutic approach known as logotherapy, which suggests that human beings are most motivated by a search for meaning, rather than pleasure, in life. If meaning is what you are searching for in this trying season, why not pick up this book today?

Get the e-book from Amazon.

 

5. The Courage to Be Disliked

Translated from Japanese, The Courage to Be Disliked: How to Free Yourself, Change Your Life and Achieve Real Happiness by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga uses Adlerian psychology to show us how we can free ourselves from the shackles of our past, our doubts and the expectations that others have of us, and be happy. Written as a dialogue between a philosopher and a youth, The Courage to Be Disliked contends that all problems are interpersonal relationship problems, that feelings of inferiority are subjective assumptions, that life is a series of moments, and that you can be happy now.

Disclaimer: We do not fully agree with all the views presented in this book, especially those about denying and suppressing trauma which borders on victim blaming. If you would like to speak to someone, the National Care Hotline on 6202-6868 will offer emotional support to anyone whose lives have been disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak.

Get the e-book from Amazon.